Scimitar

Scimitar

The scimitar began to be used in the 16th century. It has a blade with one-sided sharpening on the concave side (the so-called reverse bend). The scimitar’s handle is deprived of a guard and has an extension for an emphasis of a hand.
In literature, scimitars and sabers are sometimes called scimitars, and sometimes this name is assigned exclusively to the daggers of the Janissaries. It is not right. Only a weapon with a small double bend can be called a scimitar. The length of the blade could be different. In the Janissaries, scimitars were really short, but cavalry samples could have blades up to 90 cm long. The scimitar weight, regardless of their size, was at least 0.8 kg. With less weight, weapons became difficult to chop.
It was possible to chop, chop and cut with a scimitar. Moreover, chopping blows were applied by the upper part of the blade, and the cutting lower — by the concave — part. That is, they cut it with a scimitar, like a saber or a katana, so he had no guards. But there was a difference. The concave blade “bit into” the enemy itself. And to prevent the scimitar from escaping from his hand, his handle was supplied with ears tightly covering the fighter’s hand behind. For the heaviest samples, an emphasis was placed under the usual handle for the second hand.