Turkish saber kilich

Turkish saber kilich

Kylych, Klych (tur. Kılıç — Kylych) is a generic term for long-blade weapons in Turkey. In domestic [what?] Weapons science, the word kylych means one of the types of Turkish saber. The bend of the blade begins at the end of the second third. The upper third of the blade is straight. Elman occupies most of the upper third of the blade. Dales, in most cases, are absent. The handle is straight or curved (the top does not protrude beyond the handle). The cross was used simple and complex (sabers of the XIX century). For canine riders, the crosspiece could be absent. The mass of a saber varies, on average, from one to one and a half kilograms. Canine — a chopping and stabbing saber, which was used by both foot soldiers and horsemen. Massive elman allowed him to be used against warriors in armor of a high degree of protection.

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Scimitar

Scimitar

The scimitar began to be used in the 16th century. It has a blade with one-sided sharpening on the concave side (the so-called reverse bend). The scimitar’s handle is deprived of a guard and has an extension for an emphasis of a hand.
In literature, scimitars and sabers are sometimes called scimitars, and sometimes this name is assigned exclusively to the daggers of the Janissaries. It is not right. Only a weapon with a small double bend can be called a scimitar. The length of the blade could be different. In the Janissaries, scimitars were really short, but cavalry samples could have blades up to 90 cm long. The scimitar weight, regardless of their size, was at least 0.8 kg. With less weight, weapons became difficult to chop.

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Polish saber type N3b pa Zablotskamu on the XVII century

Polish saber type N3b pa Zablotskamu on the XVII century

Polish saber N3b type of Zablotskaya kept in the Museum of the Polish Army (Warsaw). Dates from the first half of the XVII century.

Type IIIb saber has a very simple structure and often primitive finish handle, but it has excellent practical properties. These swords are usually lightweight and well balanced for both the wrist and on the shoulder. The design of the inclined forward navershsha allows the use of «pistol» grip, as in type IV saber. This handle increases accuracy and allows the use of additional protection the brush as in the type II of number.
At the same time, to pyarstonak alone enhances finger grip in the lateral plane and increases the rate of attack, but also prevents loss chain sword with hands.
The versatility of this type of saber suggests that it was used in the cavalry, which could dismount when you need it.
Similar sword widely used in Hungary.

Saber № 3b with a narrow blade and a pronounced long stylus. Cross-Phillips, it is often associated with navershsham chain. Navershsha bent forward at an angle of 45 degrees. These swords are good for high Mojave strokes and circular strokes with the pedestrian fencing.

Polish saber type N3b pa Zablotskamu on the XVII century

Polish saber type N3b pa Zablotskamu on the XVII century

1845 French boarding saber

French boarding saber of 1845

It is stored in the museum Muzeum Wojska Polskiego in Warsaw.

French boarding saber of 1845. It is stored in the museum Muzeum Wojska Polskiego in Warsaw

The French boarding saber is kept in the Museum of Muzeum Wojska Polskiego in Warsaw, blade length 676 mm, width 37 mm, thickness at the base 9 mm, single-blade, with wide lobes, the lobes reach a double-edged pen.

The sea anchor is knocked out on the sides of the blade. On the butt of the blade, the name of the weapons factory is stamped: «Manufre Role de Châtellerault 9bre 1845.» The cup is iron, closed, painted black. The cup is connected to the headband. The headband is iron, octagonal in cross section. The lower edge of the headband is obliquely cut. At the top of the headband I saw a riveted hovostovik blade. The handle is iron, octagonal, tapering to the headband. The headband and hilt are painted black.

A boarding saber is perhaps the most famous personal weapon of a sailor. Its popularity probably stems from the fact that it is short enough to be usable during clashes in a small space on a ship. Another advantage was its ease of use. Successful mastery of a boarding saber required less training than mastery of a rapier or a sword, and was also more effective on a narrow deck than using long-blade weapons. With the improvement of artillery and the introduction of mechanical power plants, the use of boarding was discontinued, although in some countries boarding sabers were the armament of sailors until the 1930s.

Our version is slightly different from the original.

French boarding saber of 1845